Description

The memory system has become extremely important. Memory is slow, and this is the primary reason that computers don’t run significantly faster than they do. In large-scale computer installations such as the building-sized systems powering Google.com, Amazon.com, and the financial sector, memory is often the largest dollar cost as well as the largest consumer of energy. Consequently, improvements in the memory system can have significant impact on the real world, improving power and energy, performance, and/or dollar cost.

Moreover, many of the problems we see in the memory system are cross-disciplinary in nature—their solution would likely require work at all levels, from applications to circuits.

Our primary goal with MEMSYS is to showcase interesting ideas that will spark conversation between disparate groups—to get applications people and operating systems people and compiler people and system architecture people and interconnect people and circuits people to talk to each other about the problem.

Call for paper

Important Dates

Draft paper submission deadline:2018-04-30

Call for paper description

We invite you to submit papers and talk abstracts to the MEMSYS conference, to be held October 2018 in Washington, DC. MEMSYS has become the premiere US forum for research in memory systems, including hardware and software aspects, from technology and devices up to compilers and programming models.

The memory system has become extremely important recently: memory is slow, and this is the primary reason that computers don’t run significantly faster than they do. In large-scale computer installations such as the building-sized systems powering Google.com, Amazon.com, and the financial sector, memory is often the largest dollar cost as well as the largest consumer of energy. Consequently, improvements in the memory system can have significant impact on the real world, improving power and energy, performance, and/or dollar cost. Moreover, many of the problems we see in the memory system are cross-disciplinary in nature—their solution would likely require work at all levels, from applications to circuits. Thus, while the scope of the problem is memory, the scope of the solutions will be much wider.

Topics of submission

Previously unpublished papers containing significant novel ideas and technical results are solicited. Papers focusing on system, software, and architecture level concepts, outside of traditional conference scopes, will be preferred over others (e.g., the desired focus is away from pipeline design, processor cache design, prefetching, data prediction, etc.). Symposium topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Memory-system design from both hardware and software perspectives
- Memory failure modes and mitigation strategies
- Memory-system resilience, especially at large scale
- Memory and system security issues
- Operating system design for hybrid/nonvolatile memories
- Technologies like flash, DRAM, STT-MRAM, 3DXP, memristors, etc.
- Memory-centric programming models, languages, optimization
- Compute-in-memory and compute-near-memory technologies
- Large-scale data movement: networks, hardware, software, mitigation
- Virtual memory redesign for unifying storage/memory/accelerators
- Algorithmic & software memory-management techniques
- Emerging memory technologies, both hardware and software, including memory-related blockchain applications
- Interference at the memory level across datacenter applications
- Issues in the design and operation of large-memory machines
- In-memory databases and NoSQL stores
- Post-CMOS scaling efforts and memory technologies to support them, including cryogenic, neural, quantum, and heterogeneous memories

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Contact information

  • badawy@nmsu.edu

Sponsored By

  • IEEE Computer Society
    MemSys LLC