Description

The Computer Security Foundations Symposium (CSF) is an annual conference for researchers in computer security, to examine current theories of security, the formal models that provide a context for those theories, and techniques for verifying security. It was created in 1988 as a workshop of the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Security and Privacy, in response to a 1986 essay by Don Good entitled “The Foundations of Computer Security—We Need Some.” The meeting became a “symposium” in 2007, along with a policy for open, increased attendance. Over the past two decades, many seminal papers and techniques have been presented first at CSF. For more details on the history of the symposium, visit CSF's home.

The program includes papers and panels. Topics of interest include access control, information flow, covert channels, cryptographic protocols, database security, language-based security, authorization and trust, verification techniques, integrity and availability models, and broad discussions concerning the role of formal methods in computer security and the nature of foundational research in this area.

Call for paper

Call for paper description

The Computer Security Foundations Symposium is an annual conference for researchers in computer security. CSF seeks papers on foundational aspects of computer security, such as formal security models, relationships between security properties and defenses, principled techniques and tools for design and analysis of security mechanisms, as well as their application to practice. While CSF welcomes submissions beyond the topics listed below, the main focus of CSF is foundational security: submissions that lack foundational aspects risk rejection.

Author guidelines

Submitted papers must not substantially overlap with papers that have been published or that are simultaneously submitted to a journal or a conference with published proceedings.

Papers must be submitted using the two-column IEEE Proceedings style available for various document preparation systems at the IEEE Conference Publishing Services page. All papers should be at most 12 pages long, not counting bibliography and well-marked appendices. Committee members are not required to read appendices, and so the paper must be intelligible without them.

CSF'19 will employ a light form of double-blind reviewing. Submitted papers must (a) omit any reference to the authors' names or the names of their institutions, and (b) reference the authors' own related work in the third person (e.g., not "We build on our previous work ..." but rather "We build on the work of ..."). Nothing should be done in the name of anonymity that weakens the submission or makes the job of reviewing the paper more difficult (e.g., important background references should not be omitted or anonymized). Please see the conference site for answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) that address many common concerns. When in doubt, contact the program chairs.

Papers failing to adhere to any of the instructions above will be rejected without consideration of their merits.

Papers intended for one of the special sessions should select the "Computer-Aided Cryptography", "Blockchain and smart contract", "Machine learning meets security and privacy" option, as appropriate.

At least one coauthor of each accepted paper is required to attend CSF to present the paper. In the event of difficulty in obtaining visas for travel, exceptions can be made and will be discussed on a case-by-case basis.

Topics of submission

  • access control
  • accountability
  • anonymity and privacy
  • authentication
  • blockchain
  • computer-aided cryptography
  • data and system integrity
  • database security
  • decidability and complexity
  • distributed systems security
  • electronic voting
  • formal methods and verification
  • decision theory
  • hardware-based security
  • information flow control
  • intrusion detection
  • language-based security
  • machine learning
  • network security
  • data provenance
  • mobile security
  • security metrics
  • security protocols
  • smart contract
  • software security
  • socio-technical security
  • trust management
  • usable security
  • web security

Message

Leave a message

Refresh

Contact information

  • csf2019@stevens.edu

Sponsored By

  • Carnegie Mellon University

Supported By

  • IEEE Computer Society